My Classroom Work Task System

Workbasket Wednesday Linkup for Structured Work Systems and Independent Work Systems
I'm linking up for Workbasket Wednesday!

I don't know if it's the resurrection of Uncle Jessie in the all new Fuller House, but saying the phrase "Workbasket Wednesday" keeps bringing up the memory of the jingle for the radio show that he and Joey worked on in the original show.  "Workbasket Wednesday....comin' atcha!"  Okay, on to the work tasks.

My classroom work task system is a labor of love.  Truthfully, work tasks are not something that is commonly used in my school.  I started curating (hoarding) items about two years ago.    By the time the next school year rolled around, I had an arsenal of tasks.  I love the fact that it gives my students a chance to practice functional academics.  I have a para that runs the station and it runs like a well oiled machine.  He resets the tasks, takes data, and is the general overlord of the work tasks.  This is also a huge positive, as it's a daily routine that requires little muss or fuss.

My tasks are pretty varied since I have several academics students and a couple that are working on more basic skills.  Even the types of schedules used varies, yet my students are able to all work from the same system.

Classroom work tasks systems are great for teaching a variety of learners how to work independently while working hands-on.  There are so many way to differentiate a work task system to fit your students needs.

I have one student that completes work tasks every day.  For the rest of my students, they complete work tasks twice per week.  On the other days, they are completing work on Xtra Math and completing their work binders with IEP work.  There is a schedule on one side of our shelves where students can check what they'll be doing on that day.

Work Task systems are an awesome way to have students practice hands-on skills and learn to follow a schedule. They are great for autism and special education classroom.


My one student's schedule features letters and numbers.  He takes the letter/number off his schedule, matches it to the correct task box, and completes it.  For my more academic students, I started them off with the same schedule in the beginning of the year.  However they caught on very quickly and I realized I needed to up the ante.  I decided to write their tasks in a bulleted list form.  The positive of this is I can also add more than 3 work tasks if I find a students flies through the tasks too quickly.

Classroom work tasks systems are great for teaching a variety of learners how to work independently while working hands-on.  There are so many way to differentiate a work task system to fit your students needs.

You might notice that I also have phrases on some of my task boxes.  This was another way we stepped our game up, since I have several strong readers.  I do have a couple of reading who don't have very strong word recognition.  However, I have found they have been able to adapt pretty easily.

Classroom work tasks systems are great for teaching a variety of learners how to work independently while working hands-on.  There are so many way to differentiate a work task system to fit your students needs.




2 comments

  1. This is great Liz! Thanks so much for linking up!!! So great to see others' systems!
    Chris
    Autism Classroom Resources

    ReplyDelete
  2. this is awesome! thank you!

    ReplyDelete

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