Basic Work Tasks for the Secondary Autism Classroom

Work tasks are a great way to give our students with autism hands-on learning opportunities for very little or no money. This is especially important for our secondary learners, being that many of these skills can transfer to a work site or job environment.

Hopefully most of you have packed away your classroom and work tasks for the year in favor for some kind of outdoor lounging area and an alcoholic drink.  No?  Same here.  I'm not working summer school myself, but the fact that I am 1. purchasing my first house in another state, and 2. prepping to take the BCBA exam at the end of August, I am questioning whether or not it would have been more relaxing summer for me to be working.

Anyhow, I have gotten word that more than likely I will be moving to a lower ratio class next year. This means more independence, more academics, and more rigor.  Although I’m really jazzed to be making the baby step to something different, this means I am going to have to liquidate some of the work tasks I have collected over the years to make room for more advanced stuff.  Before that, I wanted to share some of my favorites for Workbasket Wednesday.



In a previous post I gave you some tips about keeping your middle school classroom age-appropriate.  I think most of my more basic work tasks fit the bill:

You might remember my soda can sorting work task.  I can't take credit for this; I found it on Pinterest a while ago.  It was too good not to recreate (because soda).
Work tasks are a great way to give our students with autism hands-on learning opportunities for very little or no money. This is especially important for our secondary learners, being that many of these skills can transfer to a work site or job environment.

A small craft box and plastic beads made a simple, cheap sorting work tasks.  The great thing about this work task is that you can use as many or as few beads and you like.  One of my students really showed his true work stamina by how long he could work on this task.
Work tasks are a great way to give our students with autism hands-on learning opportunities for very little or no money. This is especially important for our secondary learners, being that many of these skills can transfer to a work site or job environment.

I received this really interesting work tasks set from School Specialty in one of my Donors Choose projects.  It come with all sorts of nuts, bolts, and other hardware goodies and instructions of different work tasks that can be used.  Honestly, a trip to Home Depot and some imagination is probably way cheaper than this thing was ($70!!!).  Even so, it's been put to good use this year.  Refer to the picture below as to how to assemble, because frankly I have no idea what the name of all these little doo-dads are.
Work tasks are a great way to give our students with autism hands-on learning opportunities for very little or no money. This is especially important for our secondary learners, being that many of these skills can transfer to a work site or job environment.



Colored straws from Ikea and some plastic cups labeled with colors made a simple sorting tasks.
Work tasks are a great way to give our students with autism hands-on learning opportunities for very little or no money. This is especially important for our secondary learners, being that many of these skills can transfer to a work site or job environment.

As you can see, it's pretty easy to make work tasks to target more basic skills.  With a little imagination, you can come up with some really great task for your students!

2 comments

  1. Hi, I have made several work tasks (I've gotten ideas from your blog and love it!), but where do you store all of them? Maybe you have a bigger space than I do, but I've made several and just don't seem to have the space available to have them all out for use...so I want to rotate, but I haven't come across any information about how teachers store all these materials. :)

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  2. Hey! If you look at this previous post, you can see how I store my tasks in bins on a bookshelf: http://www.theautismvault.com/2016/03/my-classroom-worktask-system.html. For smaller task, I also use pencil cases, Ziploc containers, and index card holders. Hope that helps!

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